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When (Medical) Reality Gets In The Way
Quote22.12.2012 08:251 people like thisLike
 

I thought I'd start a thread talking about medical realities of life getting in the way of our desires.

I'm a feederist (who likes both sides of things, but leans feedie) who has chosen not to actively gain, but certainly enjoys food & eating & pigging out on occasion (or more than occasion) and playing around with our fetish. November of 2011, after 6 weeks of pain, I was diagnosed with gallstones. Because my insurance doesn't cover the removal of my gallbladder (you can't just remove the stones, because they'll just come right back), I have to eat a low fat diet.

Yes, that's right folks. A feedie having to eat a low fat diet. Cruel, cruel fate.

So I've had to eat a low-fat diet for over a year. Fried foods and all the wonderful delicious fatty treats many of us love are right out. (Fried foods and savory dairy fats were my pig out loves before, so it's been hard. I miss french fries & eating large amounts of cheese.) I've also had to figure out how to continue to play with my fetish (as well as continue with being a foodie) while eating a low fat diet. Yes, I've been indulging in the feeder side of things more, but I still lean feedie and I've had to figure out how to pig out in a way that won't make me very sick. I now know every low fat and fat free food on the market and what the best ones are to pig out on.

I've been extremely lucky that the local feederist munch has been caring and accommodating and taken care to meet up in places where I can have my dietary needs met but are also all you can eat & have the kinds of food everyone else wants to eat too.

Anyone else have the medical reality of their life get in the way of their desires? How do you deal with it?

Quote22.12.2012 09:012 people like thisLike
 

I've had this happen to me before too. I was actively gaining weight and was more or less forced to stop dead in my tracks and go in the opposite direction. I was at my heaviest pulling in at about 300 pounds when I had some bloodwork done and the overall numbers weren't as good as they could have been. I have a family history of poor heart health, and a plethora of heart problems are prevalent on both sides of my family. I was instructed by my doctor (who's a real cutie patootie and a total pro, by the way) to begin making a conscious effort to lose weight unless I wanted to suffer a similar fate. I have since lost close to 60 pounds. I enjoyed being fatter and I miss carrying around that extra weight sometimes, but I enjoy good health more. And even though I've lost a considerable amount of weight, I'm still pretty fat. I'm just not as fat as I had wanted to be.

Quote22.12.2012 12:331 people like thisLike
 

Thanks for your reply. The part that I didn't put (because most people don't want to hear it, but in that way, I feel like it needs to be talked about even more) was that I lost 30 lbs on this diet. And, honestly, I didn't miss 'em. I like being able to find clothes in stores. I like being able to do stairs easier. Honestly, I am planning on losing more weight, just because I miss being able to do things like rollerskating without extreme pain. I'm sure I'll still be chubby, though. And I know I'll still have my urges and I'll still play with feederism. (Hell, when I was that weight before I gained this weight, I still played with it!)

It's kinda a shame that we can't talk about weight loss on here, because there ARE feederists who want to or need to lose weight for whatever their reasons and it would be nice to have a place to talk about what its like having the need or even the desire to lose weight while your sexual desires are telling you to do the opposite, and how you balance the 2 out. It can be a hard balance and it can be tough ignoring that (or finding other ways to indulge that) voice that tells you to eat and get huge when you know that not getting huge or even losing weight is what you really need for yourself in all the other ways. And it's really hard to find feederists forums where you won't be ridiculed or shunned or even banned for wanting to talk about weight loss from a feederist perspective (that isn't just a knee jerk "losing weight is bad, mmkay!").

Quote22.12.2012 13:041 people like thisLike
 

I think it's a pretty common issue that sooner or later the medical realities of life are getting in the way of our desires.

 

Since non-feedists and skinny folks also experience all kind of illnesses, why shouldn't we? A couple of years ago I was diagnosed with a) Fatty Liver and b) Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). My stomach usually produces too much gastric acid, which I didn't know for many years but probably has been the case since I was born. During my active gaining years I also loved to eat large amounts of cheese and other dairy products which are full of saturated fats that helps so efficiently with gaining a lot of pounds.

 

Today I certainly enjoy food and eating, on occasion eating a lot and also would love to gain some more. But the medical issues mentioned above led me again to a more balanced diet. I have to avoid acid-forming food and replace saturated fats with vegetable ones. Gallbladder and Fatty Liver problems have pretty much in common. But I think it's not neccessary to eat low-fat, but to choose healthy fats (omega 3, 6 and 9) which can be found in linseed and sesame oil, fish (3), soya and sunflower oil (6) or olive- and rape oil, avocados and almonds (9).

 

I still have to figure out if it is possible to gain with healthy food. If so, you would have to eat pretty much, because the body works much more efficiently with the help of the intake of healthy fats. This is partly what we wish for, but makes gaining or even maintaining a little less easy. Another problem is that a healthy diet is a little more expensive, and even more if you choose to eat large amounts. But at least it would be fun to do some research!

 

Wink

Quote22.12.2012 13:091 people like thisLike
 

So our entries crossed! You are so right, that it needs to be talked about this more. When a feedist needs to loose weight due to medical issues, he/her is still a feedist.

Quote28.12.2012 12:071 people like thisLike
 

@Thurid I absolutely have to eat low fat, as what happens is when you eat fat, the gallbladder pushes out bile through the bile duct. When you have gallstones, the more fat you eat, the more it pushes, and the higher your likelyhood that the stones will get stuck in the bile duct and cause a world of pain. As far as the gallbladder is concerned, there's no such thing as "Good fats" and "Bad fats", there are fats, and they get digested in the same way (the effect of them on the rest of your body is what makes them "good" or "bad".) Whether or not I'm eating healthy fats or unhealthy fats, the gallbladder still has to help the liver out and put out bile.

 

In fact, I just had to go to the emergency room at 6am on the 26th for having a bit too much cheese the night before and being in extreme pain. (But, but, but... Christmas cheese plate!)

 

Also, I'd like to posit that a feedie is still a feedie even if they choose to lose weight for non-mandatory medical issues. As long as you're turned on by the IDEA of gaining weight, regardless of whether or not the reality actually does anything for you, then you're a feedie. (It's like an incest fetishist liking to fantasize or pretend with a willing, adult, non-related partner, but would never actually commit incest IRL and the very idea of doing it for real turns them off.)

Quote28.12.2012 13:461 people like thisLike
 
I've been there. I have no gall bladder, and while I can eat all the fatty foods I want, it wreaks havoc on my digestive system, resulting in severe IBS. The only way I can control it is through low fat, low dairy eating. And seriously..... Cheese! My brother is an artisan cheese maker, I'll live with the pain, but at some point I have to stop. I have no feeder inclinations, so I have very little outlet beyond the occasional stuffing, especially since my hubby is uninterested.
Quote28.12.2012 13:511 people like thisLike
 

I can relate. I suffer from severe IBS and I am also a bit lactose intolerant. It really makes gaining weight seem more and more difficult since I can hardly eat large meals without feeling very sick afterwards. Doctors warned me of high blood pressure, although I'm not sure what side effects that can lead too. I wish everyone in the feedist community could have perfect health and enjoy the pleasures of weight gain :(

Quote01.01.2013 08:031 people like thisLike
 

@ElektroInfecto I'm sorry to hear that you had to go to the emergency room and totally believe that you have to REDUCE your fat intake. But some people who suffer from severe pain caused by gallstones believe they have to AVOID all kinds of fats. That was my intention when I said this is not necessary.

 

As a health concious feedee I'm just searching for a way to gain or at least maintain my weight without developing gallstones or liver cirrhosis. I'm happy at my current weight that allows to carry some chubby thighs, a nice big butt and an even bigger belly with me - I wouldn't want to change a single thing about that! But I also know that prevention isn't very popular within our feedist community, our healthcare system and society as a whole.

 

Only a few have such strong bodies to be able to enjoy a complete weight gain journey, all the others are only allowed to experience parts of it and sooner or later they will have to stop. I also wish this kind of pleasurable experience was life-long accessible to everyone who longs for it.

 

Quote01.01.2013 22:491 people like thisLike
 

I >>>now know every low fat and fat free food on the market and what the best ones are to pig out on.

 

can you tell us some?

Quote08.01.2013 19:131 people like thisLike
 

re: awesome LF and FF foods to pig out on

 

This is going to be fun. :-D

 

I love chips and dip. So I get those baked potato chips and Trader Joe's fat free sour cream (has to be Trader Joe's. The other brands put fillers in and they're gross.) and some dip mix & go to town. I've also been known to pig out with the flavored baked potato chips and using them to scoop up fat free cottage cheese.

 

I adore ranch, but the bottled low fat and fat free ranch dressing is usually disgusting. However, the packets of the Hidden Valley ranch powder are fat free. I actually bought a tub of the powder at BJ's for 8 bucks. It theoretically makes like 300 servings or something. I sprinkle that shit on anything I want to taste like ranch.

 

J-E-L-L-O. It's naturally fat free. I love lime Jello mixed with crushed pineapple. I can eat a whole batch in 1 sitting. (And, damn, now I'm hungry for it.)

 

There's various desserts that can be made by mixing Jello (either the powder or made up into liquid) with fat free Cool Whip. Sprinkling some mango Jello powder on top of fat free Cool Whip? Yummy. (I can eat the whole tub of Cool Whip.)

 

Jello pudding can easily be made with skim milk. Most flavors are fat free naturally (pistachio isn't because they put bits of the nuts in). I've been known to go to town on the cheesecake flavor. (Also, chocolate, butterscotch, or banana) It's no substitute for real cheesecake, but when you can't have cheesecake, it scratches the itch.

 

I made a pudding pie before Christmas out of a low fat graham cracker crust (wasn't that low fat so I couldn't eat the whole pie in one sitting, which was sad) and the seasonal pumpkin spice flavor of Jello pudding.

 

I found a fantastic low fat fudge recipe (will post upon request) at Christmas that my normal eating friends say wasn't just good for low fat, but was just good period. That was enjoyable.

 

It's easy to find low fat or fat free sherbet. Orange is delicious, but some Walmarts carry a pineapple sherbet that's crazy good.

 

Fruit is good. A properly constructed salad (with low fat toppings and low to no fat dressing) is awesome. I love salad and can eat huge amounts of it.

 

Shrimp are very low fat. Hell yeah. (So's crab, just no butter.)

 

Also, barbecue. Get out the grill. Chicken breast is low fat, and barbecue sauce usually is no fat. Oh, man, I went to an all-you-can-eat BBQ joint in Florida while visiting a feederist friend of mine... I ate like 3 or 4 huge chicken breasts, all the sides, 2 trips to the salad bar, some dessert... I swear, the waiter there had to be some kind of feederist himself, because he kept pushing food on me, and even suggested to box up a chicken breast to take home.

 

The feederists in the DC area used to go to BD's Mongolian BBQ before it closed. I had figured out how to make a really tasty, huge plate for only 10g of fat. I'd have 2 of them.

 

Hmm, the other night we went to a Chinese buffet with sushi and hibachi. I made this thing with noodles, onions, a ton of mushrooms (I adore mushrooms), and their tasty marinaded chicken. Had it 2x. Man, that night, the part in my brain that says "stop, you're full" just didn't kick in. I literally closed the place down and wanted to keep eating. It was AMAZING.

 

Anyway, that's all I can think of off the top of my head. If I think of others, I'll let you know.

Quote28.01.2013 13:381 people like thisLike
 

RE: lower fat options to pig out on...

 

Fage's non-fat Greek yogurt is MAGIC and pretty much the perfect alternative to sour cream. I've used as a base for a plethora of chip dips, shakes, and on top of tacos or burritos. Plus, it's got protein, so I find it more filling. Win-win!

Quote28.01.2013 23:061 people like thisLike
 

Fage, while tasty, is also pricey as hell. I've actually learned how easy it is to make your own Greek yogurt (take yogurt, strain it, done), but when I tried making dip with it, it came out flavorless and not yummy at all, so I'm sticking with Trader Joe's FF Sour Cream for that.

Quote29.01.2013 20:192 people like thisLike
 

I'm intrigued that everyone presumes that we all value health equally. I guess I should explain that.

I've had fibromyalgia since my mid-20s (chronic muscle pain, insomnia, fatigue, etc), and multiple sclerosis since my mid-30s (I'm lucky so far--mostly no motor symptoms, only minor stuff like choking, word loss, bladder urgency, and fatigue). So the thought of living less long doesn't bother me in the least. What does bother me is the thought of being infirm and miserable for a long time in old age. (Cue end of life choices rant here.)

So, for me, when I got diagnosed with diabetes, it terrified me at first, because it was part of my dad's protracted, very unpleasant last couple of years, but then it made me realise that I want to live the way I want, and eat the way I want, and figure out how to hand in my ticket when the ride feels over to me.

I don't think the only consideration when you get unpleasant medical news is 'How do I best obey my doctors?' (OK, I was never good at obedience. Sue me.) I think the real question is 'How do I find out good data about the risks, the certain and possible consequences, likelihoods, treatment options, etc.?' Docs ALWAYS go to 'lose weight' first. And to dietary change. And with good reason--for most people, it's the least invasive course of action. But for us, it might not balance out well if we're truly well informed.

That is, of course, entirely different than not being able to eat fat without being hospitalised. I guess I wanted to separate dietary issues (like I almost never eat wheat) from weight loss ones, and to urge information and careful decision making over just doing what the doc says.

Please don't yell at me?

Quote29.01.2013 21:131 people like thisLike
 

Juicy, I have a somewhat similar view. I don't have any physical ailments (knock on wood) but I have a lot of mental health problems, including eating disorders, and trying to consciously monitor my food intake at all puts me in an ED frame of mind. I put my mental health and happiness over my physical health, because thus far, my mental health going to shit has nearly killed me too often. If I wind up with diabetes in 20 years, so be it; I need to make it that long without killing myself first.

Quote01.02.2013 07:171 people like thisLike
 

I have a history of heart problems in my moms side of the family. I am a little over 300 lbs, and have just moved home to the family farm. I had high blood pressure, and it's been getting better since divorcing and a stressful job. I also take Lipitor for cholesterol. I don't neccesarily like being fat or not, but I can see where health problems can get in the way of feedism in one way or the other. But man, I love the big ladies :)

Quote05.02.2013 17:381 people like thisLike
 

 

I'm intrigued that everyone presumes that we all value health equally. I guess I should explain that.

I've had fibromyalgia since my mid-20s (chronic muscle pain, insomnia, fatigue, etc), and multiple sclerosis since my mid-30s (I'm lucky so far--mostly no motor symptoms, only minor stuff like choking, word loss, bladder urgency, and fatigue). So the thought of living less long doesn't bother me in the least. What does bother me is the thought of being infirm and miserable for a long time in old age. (Cue end of life choices rant here.)

So, for me, when I got diagnosed with diabetes, it terrified me at first, because it was part of my dad's protracted, very unpleasant last couple of years, but then it made me realise that I want to live the way I want, and eat the way I want, and figure out how to hand in my ticket when the ride feels over to me.

I don't think the only consideration when you get unpleasant medical news is 'How do I best obey my doctors?' (OK, I was never good at obedience. Sue me.) I think the real question is 'How do I find out good data about the risks, the certain and possible consequences, likelihoods, treatment options, etc.?' Docs ALWAYS go to 'lose weight' first. And to dietary change. And with good reason--for most people, it's the least invasive course of action. But for us, it might not balance out well if we're truly well informed.

That is, of course, entirely different than not being able to eat fat without being hospitalised. I guess I wanted to separate dietary issues (like I almost never eat wheat) from weight loss ones, and to urge information and careful decision making over just doing what the doc says.

Please don't yell at me?

Oh, I'm all about people making informed choices. They are our bodies & our lives and it is our right to do with them as we wish. I consider our kink one that has some risk, but that everyone has the right to decide how much risk (if any/if all) they wish to take. There's no right answer to that.

 

I mean, I take some risk too. Every time I put a piece of medium to high fat food in my mouth, I have to guess how much fat is in it (if I don't already know) and I have to kinda remember how much fat I've already eaten and I have to decide if it's worth the risk. I can have mild attacks that are just little twinges that remind me that, no, they're still there. I can have moderate attacks that can be treated with hard core pain killers that I carry with me at all times. And I can have major attacks that require hospitalization. I used to err on the side of complete caution... as I live with this condition, that has loosened up quite a bit. Unfortunately, lately, I've been having bad cravings that I'm having difficulty fighting (I'm usually good at telling the cravings to STFU) and I actually had an attack after the Superbowl 2 nights ago because I wasn't careful enough. (Treated it with hard core pain killers, 40 minutes of hell waiting for them to kick in, and sleeping on the couch sitting up.)

 

So, yeah... risk.

Quote16.03.2013 11:520 people like thisLike
 

 

November of 2011, after 6 weeks of pain, I was diagnosed with gallstones. Because my insurance doesn't cover the removal of my gallbladder (you can't just remove the stones, because they'll just come right back), I have to eat a low fat diet.

Yes, that's right folks. A feedie having to eat a low fat diet. Cruel, cruel fate.


The bile serves to emulsify your food. One thing you should definitely try is to take lecithin with every fatty meal. Lecithin is a common food additive (check the label on store bought foods) used as an emulsifier. It is also commonly sold at health food stores as a healthy supplement. I buy it in bulk and add it to Melissa's gain shakes. It eliminated her problems with tummy upsets.
Quote16.03.2013 11:570 people like thisLike
 

Diabetes was once a dread disease that was diagnosed because you were spilling sugar into your pee, making it taste sweet. Nowadays it is diagnosed at a far earlier stage, before any problems have developed. There are tons of cheap meds that can control it. Losing weight does not really cure diabetes but only temporarily masks some signs of it. Diabetes is a big deal and you have to do a lot of self-care. But you are not going to go blind or lose a limb if you take care of yourself.

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